Feeding Grounds

Feeding Grounds


This radiant neighborhood is best known for its student population due to its proximity to many colleges and universities. In recent years, an influx of immigrants and young professionals has taken an increasingly active role in the neighborhood. This varied mix of people creates one of the most energetic and diverse populations in Boston. Harvard Avenue, Commonwealth Avenue and Brighton Avenue host many ethnic restaurants and popular watering holes. The Honan-Allston branch public library, named after the late Boston City Councilor Brian Honan, is a treasure of information and genuine resource for the entire community.

Back Bay

It's easy to understand why the Back Bay is one of America's most desirable neighborhoods. Newbury Street, Boylston Street and Commonwealth Avenue are lined with unique shops, trendy restaurants and vintage homes, making the Back Bay an extremely fashionable destination for Boston residents and visitors. In fact, it's not uncommon to spot celebrities strolling up and down these picturesque streets. This bustling neighborhood also houses the two tallest members of Boston's skyline, the Prudential Center and the John Hancock Tower, in addition to architectural treasures such as Trinity Church and the Boston Public Library.

Bay Village

One of the smallest neighborhoods in the City of Boston, Bay Village more than makes up for its lack of size with its inviting and friendly atmosphere. Created by a landfill in the 1820's by developer Ephraim Marsh, Bay Village has been known as the Church Street District, South Cove and Kerry Village. Many of the homes look like smaller versions of Beacon Hill townhouses because the craftspeople who built the Beacon Hill residences settled in this area and built local residences for their own use. The neighborhood is also centrally located to several restaurants, the Theater District and many other cultural attractions.

Beacon Hill
One of Boston's oldest communities, Beacon Hill gets its name from a beacon that once stood atop its hill to warn locals about foreign invasion. Approximately one square mile in size, Beacon Hill is bound by Beacon Street, Bowdoin Street, Cambridge Street and Storrow Drive. Its architecture and lay- out is reflective of old colonial Boston, consisting of brick row houses with beautiful doors, decorative iron work, brick sidewalks, narrow streets, and gas lamps. Beacon Hill is also home to the Massachusetts State House and America's first African Meeting House. Charles Street, the neighborhood's main thoroughfare, is lined with antique shops and restaurants. Beacon Hill has been home to many notable Americans, including Louisa May Alcott, Oliver Wendell Homes, Daniel Webster, Robert Frost, Sylvia Plath, and Senator John Kerry.

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Situated on the banks of Boston Harbor and the Mystic River on the north side of the city, Charlestown has translated its historical roots into a thriving 21st Century neighborhood. As the home to such significant landmarks as the U.S.S. Constitution, the Bunker Hill Monument and the Navy Yard, Charlestown's allure has enticed a new generation of immigrants and young professionals to join its traditionally Irish-American population. Residents, new and old, frequent the local restaurants and establishments along Main Street and in City Square.

Boston's center of business and government combine with the Boston Common and the Public Garden to form a dynamic downtown. Downtown also serves as a sanctuary for shoppers, offering everything from large department stores to cozy boutiques. Home to many of Boston's most historic sites such as Faneuil Hall, downtown Boston will soon benefit from two innovative plans designed to enhance and enliven this area, the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway and the Crossroads Initiative. The Greenway will beautify this area by weaving twenty-seven acres of green space into the fabric of the city. Crossroads will introduce a new set of 21st century street standards through downtown and reunite the surrounding neighborhoods to Boston Harbor and each other, with the Greenway as the centerpiece.

Fenway Kenmore
Perhaps most recognized as the home of Fenway Park and the Boston Red Sox, Fenway/Kenmore also boasts many of the City's top cultural institutions, including the Museum of Fine Arts and Symphony Hall. Fenway/Kenmore also has a strong academic presence, including Boston Latin School, America's first public school, as well as several institutions of higher learning. Many of these undergraduate students, as well as young people throughout the city, are drawn to the lively bars and clubs along Lansdowne Street. The Fenway is another central thoroughfare that encircles the Back Bay Fens, the neighborhood's preeminent green space, which was designed by Frederick Law Olmstead.

Financial District

The area includes Post Office Square, the Exchange Place and International Place complexes, and the landmark Custom House Tower (now a private condominium).

The Financial District also contains the headquarters of the mutual fund companies Fidelity Investments, Putnam Investments, and DWS Scudder Investments; the world headquarters for State Street Bank; the Boston Stock Exchange; accounting firms PricewaterhouseCoopers and RSM McGladrey; loan advisor The Debt Exchange; the law firms of Goodwin Procter, WilmerHale, Kirkpatrick & Lockhart Nicholson Graham, and Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky, and Popeo, PC; the local headquarters of Bank of America (formerly Fleet Bank) and Sovereign Bank; the Langham Hotel Boston and Hilton Hotel; and the local offices of Merrill Lynch and other brokerages.

Dewey Square, One Financial Center, and the plaza and towers housing the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston are located near South Station, adjacent to and just south of the area defined above. Also part of the Financial District are 33 Arch Street, One Federal Street, the First National Bank Building building, and 101 Federal Street. The area contains many of Boston's highrise buildings in a fairly densely packed area.

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North End

Home to American patriot Paul Revere, the North End is one of Boston's most historic neighborhoods. Traditionally a first stop for immigrants arriving in Boston, the North End is most well known as an enclave of Italian immigrants. Today the North End is populated by a mixture of Italian Americans and young professionals who are attracted to the neighborhood's tight-knit feel and access to downtown. Tourists come from near and far to sample authentic Italian cuisine, enjoy a cannoli or a cappuccino, and explore its narrow streets. In recent years, a number of boutiques have opened in the North End specializing in everything from trendy clothing to jewelry. The North End also offers access to Boston's waterfront along Commercial Street. Residents and visitors can enjoy strolling and relaxing in the newly renovated Christopher Columbus Park, and during summer evenings the park is host to a performing arts series.

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South Boston

Once a predominantly Irish Catholic community, in recent years South Boston has become increasingly desirable among young professionals and families who are attracted to the neighborhood's strong sense of community and quick access to downtown and public transportation. People from all over the city enjoy taking a stroll around Castle Island, a Revolutionary War-era fort and 22-acre park that is connected to the mainland. "Southie Pride" is on full display in March when city residents flock to the neighborhood to enjoy the annual South Boston St. Patrick's Day Parade. Today the breathtaking South Boston Waterfront is emerging as Boston's newest neighborhood. Already home to the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, planned development for the Waterfront includes residential, office, retail, and hotel use. The Institute for Contemporary Art, slated to open in September, stands as an iconic symbol of the South Boston Waterfront's unlimited potential.

South End

Located just minutes from downtown and the Back Bay, in recent years the South End has become one of Boston's most popular neighborhoods. It has attracted a diverse blend of young professionals, families and a vibrant gay and lesbian population to this Boston Landmark District. You will be sure to notice the South End's renowned Victorian

Brownstone buildings and homes as you walk along Tremont Street, Columbus Avenue, and Massachusetts Avenue. Small business owners also enjoy the amenities of the South End and are supported by the national award winning Washington Gateway Main Streets Program. Some of Boston’s finest restaurants, a thriving arts community and nearly 30 parks also call the South End home.


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